FollowTrainTV

Twitch Tutorials and Streaming Advice

Posts Tagged ‘streaming advice’

How to get 20 viewers on Twitch

Many people that are new to Twitch get one or two viewers in their initial streams and often sit for hours with zero viewers. Naturally this can cause a lot of frustration and make them question their decision of becoming a Twitch streamer. If you’re wondering how to get your first 20 viewers on Twitch, we’ve put together a list of things you can do right now to edge closer to those first 20 viewers!

Just get more exposure

No surprise here, exposure is the key to any online traffic. When you are focusing on getting you your first 20 viewers, you need a plan to introduce your stream to viewers and the best way to do that is through social media and forums. A great benefit to using social media is that you can grow your social accounts when your not at your computer via your mobile phone. Don’t forget to announce the fact that your going live on your social media accounts.

Watch your own stream

Some people would call this cheating but this tactic can get you 2–3 viewers. You can use mobile devices to watch your own stream. Remember for every viewer you have you appear higher up the Twitch category page, the higher you are the more viewers you get. Just make sure that you have enough bandwidth and don’t negatively effect your streams performance.

Pick the right games

If you don’t have a strong social media presence or YouTube subscriber count, it’s going to be pretty hard to get viewers if your playing a popular game like CS:GO or LoL. Rather than going for a game that already has been streamed by multiple Twitch users go for less famous games, new releases or games made by indie developers to stand out from the masses which can prove extremely beneficial when you’re trying to get your first 20 viewers on Twitch.

Take advantage of big streamers streaming unpopular games

Continuing on from the last point, sometimes you might see a category with 3500 viewers and inside that category discover that there is only a few streamers and 3495 viewers are watching the same well known streamer. If you own that game and can jump on it quickly you can pick up some of the overflow traffic in that category.

Quality matters

The higher the quality the more the viewers. No one wants to watch a streamer that has low video quality, sound filled with static and no overlay. If you want viewers to actually watch your streams and return every time you stream then you need to make sure that the video quality is clear, the sound is easy to hear and your stream actually has a decent overlay.

Have fun

The most important thing you need to keep in mind is that you should be having fun! People can easily tell when a Twitch streamer is faking their excitement, scares or enthusiasm. People don’t want to watch you try to be funny, they want to watch you have fun playing a game, so that they can have fun too.

Reach out to others

If you’ve just launched your Twitch channel don’t have high expectations of getting hundreds or thousands of views on your first few streams. You can take part in shout-out events that more popular and bigger Twitch users hold but it’s like winning a lottery. Rather than focusing on bigger streamers focus on smaller Twitch streamers and try to get into their network. They are much more likely to give you a shout out which can result in you easily getting your first 20+ views on Twitch by being hosted by them which will helping you advance your Twitch career.

Use FollowTrain.tv

FollowTrain.tv was purposely built for new streamers to help them get a foot on the ladder, to help get an extra 10 or 20 viewers and to increase your streams exposure. Next time you stream ride the Follow Train at http://www.followtrain.tv to date it’s generated over 1,000,000 views for its users and over 70,000 follows.

Stream Regularly and have a schedule

Your favorite TV show is at the same time on the same day every week which allows people who are free at that time to tune in and enjoy the show. The same is true for Twitch streamers. I also understand that not every one can commit to a regular stream but even if it is just 2 hours per week of scheduled streaming time it will really help your channel create regular viewers.

The Final Word!

Focus on slowly growing rather than stressing about how to get more viewers. Try different things and find something that works for you and then do more of that and enjoy yourself rather than doing it only for the viewers. Follow these simple tips and you’ll surely start getting 20 or more viewers on your Twitch stream in no time.


How to set up a TeamSpeak Server with no port number on a subdomain

Before I moved the FollowTrainTV streamers community to Discord I was using both IRC and TeamSpeak to build up a community of streamers. One of the the first things I didn’t like about my original setup was that my TeamSpeak server address was horrible and difficult to remember. On top of that it had a port number attached to it. Being a technical guy I figured I could setup a subdomain on my current domain name and allow the traffic to be redirected easily.

I didn’t want to use the horrible long address given to me by my TeamSpeak service provider I wanted something simple and easy to remember so below I will show you the two ways I discovered, so that you can do the same. The first way is free and the second way cheap but in my case my current domain provider did not allow me to do it the free way so I needed to use a 3rd party to help me out.

Redirecting a subdomain to a TeamSpeak server using an SRV record

Straight out of the box some domain name providers will allow you to quickly and easily setup a subdomain on your account that can easily redirect traffic to your TeamSpeak server. You simply need to add an SRV record.

Here is a quick tutorial on how to setup the TeamSpeak SRV record in cPanel which is a very common software used by many web server hosting companies. If your hosting company does not use cPanel then you may have to email them to ask them how to add an SRV record.

Redirecting a subdomain to a TeamSpeak server without an SRV record

So it turns out I am one of the unlucky people who’s server / domain provider doesn’t have the ability to add an SRV record. Instead I had to use a third party provider to allow me to have a subdomain which can redirect traffic to my TeamSpeak server.

Enter TS3DNS.com a company that offers a redirect service for a small fee. I paid $6.99 for a one year subscription which allows me to achieve the same flexibility as the free option above. It’s simple to use and after 24 hours I was happy to see that I can now use a subdomain with no port number attached to connect to my TeamSpeak server. There was no way for my current hosting company to do this so I had to pay the $6.99 but it works perfectly and I am very happy.

The added bonus of setting up your TeamSpeak server under a subdomain

One of the cool side effects of this kind of setup is that if you change the company that provides you with your TeamSpeak server you do not have to tell all of your clan members and friends the new address. You simply adjust the DNS record and usually within around 10 minutes your existing subdomain will be pointing to your brand new server address. This is super important if you are looking to grow your community because every time you change the physical address of your server you will loose some of the people that visit your server.

The Final Word

If you are using TeamSpeak then you really should setup a subdomain for your server, how you do it depends entirely on who hosts your current domain name.

If you haven’t already checked out Discord then I suggest you do, because it was built with gamers in mind. Imagine if IRC and TeamSpeak had a baby together, well then you can begin to understand what Discord is. Discord has desktop apps, mobile apps, voice comms and a rich text chat all in one application that will encourage your community to idle and hang out on your server, It’s free and much easier to setup and use. It’s a no brainer!

If you want to try out Discord for the first time then you can join me and other Twitch streamers on the FollowTrainTV Community Discord.


Start streaming on Twitch – 7 Tips

In just over one and a half years of streaming on Twitch, I’ve gained nearly 20,000 followers (Which you can check here on my channel). I wanted to outline what I believe are the most important things you should be doing to maximize your potential when you start streaming on Twitch. Getting people to your stream is hard enough, keeping them there is even harder.

I have spent many hours reading and learning about streaming and the Twitch platform. I have also learned from personal experiences and the experience of others. I run followtrain.tv and I run a Twitch community where we discuss Twitch related topics. It would be fair to say I know a thing or two about streaming.

Here are 7 things to keep in mind when you are just start streaming on Twitch.

1. Make sure your internet connection is solid

You don’t need to run out and buy a dedicated T1 line when you start streaming on Twitch, but you definitely need to have a decent cable broadband or fibre optic connection. The number one thing you need to do is be able to stream and with a bad internet connection you will end up with a totally black screen or a laggy viewing experience. I already outlined in another post what the best settings to use when streaming, so make sure you check that out.

2. Get a decent microphone

People visit Twitch to watch and listen to people playing games. If your commentary is inaudible due to a low-quality microphone, you won’t get many followers or viewers. You don’t need a recording studio quality mic but you do need to be sure that your voice is clear and louder than your music or in-game sound, with little to no static or hum.

Try and get a microphone with built in noise reduction in case something is going on behind you, perhaps you live near a busy road and the windows are open because of the heat outside. These small sounds will be heard on your stream as just background noise which can really irritate people. I keep an updated list of what I consider to be the Best Hardware for Twitch.

3. Get some custom graphics and a decent overlay

Your channel and brand is important for people to remember you, starting at just $5 you can get custom graphic design service. You will create your HUD (Heads up Display) in your streaming software, something like OBS or xSplit. Personally, I do mine with OBS. The idea is to make sure that your stream looks good and is viewer friendly. There are a ton of streamers out there, so the viewer experience is going to be what sets you apart.

For example you could create a border around your webcam that tells something about your personality or your favorite game. It is also important that pop up notifications give praise where it is due. When someone gives you a donation or follows you you should have a pop up or something cool happening.

When viewers see a celebration over even the smallest of donations, they are more likely to donate a few dollars as well. Make an even bigger celebration for your top donors. Remember, people are throwing money at you for doing something you would probably be doing anyway, so make sure they know how grateful you are.

4. A HD webcam is a must

Okay, so maybe Lirik doesn’t use a webcam… but you are not Lirik and you didn’t start streaming nearly five years ago when he did. Do yourself a favour and buy a decent webcam. There are plenty of streamers who don’t use a webcam, this is true, they also they don’t have many followers or viewers. If you want to be one of them random unknown faces then be my guest but it wont help you grow on Twitch.

People like to see faces, even if you think you are the ugliest person on earth I promise you beauty is in the eye of the beholder. It’s just nice to have a face to go with the voice and the username, so don’t be shy.

I was simply amazed how much people did not troll me when I first used a webcam. Most people are genuinely friendly. We all got bullied a little school for one thing or another and that fear is still with us but in my experience on Twitch it’s not an issue. Really you should try it once or twice and I promise you wont regret it, in fact you will enjoy streaming even more. Yes it feels awkward at first and maybe you need to get comfortable with speaking before turning on the camera but sooner or later you need a webcam.

You want to be able to stream and record in high definition a 720p camera is the minimum, but a 1080p is always preferred. Many viewers, when looking for a new channel to watch, won’t even click on one unless they see a picture-in-picture cam. Read more about what I think is the best webcam for Twitch.

5. Interact with your viewers

There is only so much that hardware and software can do for you, and there are a ton of great players out there. After that, your persona has to carry you. You will truly begin to stand apart from the crowd and gain a following when people see your personality, and that means interacting. Gaining followers and regular viewers is really about being entertaining.

Once you have hundreds or thousands of followers, you may not be able to greet everyone by name, but at least when you are starting out, don’t let people slip in and out of your channel without even being acknowledged. Say something like, “Hi [username], welcome to the stream!” Try to answer questions that viewers ask, and even ask some of your own and check out the responses. Yes, you need to pay attention to the game too, but the game isn’t following you or making donations, so put your viewers first.

Don’t argue in the chat box. If someone is really being obnoxious, mute them quickly and move on. Do not waste time or energy with trolls, insta-ban them and forget about it, they will move on to someone else who will entertain their trolling efforts.

6. Get a chat bot for your stream

I’m not talking about view bots—those are a good way to get your channel banned. If you are a regular Twitch viewer, you probably already know what a chat bot is. Chat bots basically serve one purpose—they keep the chat box safe for you and your followers and provide additional interaction functionality.

They can ban people for saying certain words, they can tell users what music you are currently playing and they can even help you run giveaways and answer common questions for you. You can also give certain moderators the ability to add commands to some bots to further reduce the amount of work you have to do when streaming.

My personal favorite is DeepBot. DeepBot is not free and can be overwhelming at first, start with something like Moobot or Nightbot and consider DeepBot later on.

7. Be consistent and persistent

When you first start streaming on Twitch, setting up a schedule for streaming is in my opinion the single most important thing you can do if you want to build regular viewers. How do you expect to get regular viewers if you cant even be regular yourself?

Being consistent allows you to get repeat viewers rather than just competing for whoever happens to be on when you decide to stream. Don’t give up if your stream doesn’t take off straight away. Sometimes it takes a while for people to get to know you and decide that your channel is more fun or exciting than the other channels that are currently open.

Keep learning and striving to become a better streamer, watch other peoples streams and figure out why they have so many viewers. What are they doing differently and ask yourself how can you be more like them?

In my personal experience, last year when I had a three day a week schedule, I was able to build my viewers up to an average of around 70-80 people per stream. I took six months off in the Autumn of 2015 and when I returned I struggled to get just 10 viewers. At the time of writing this article I am now back averaging 30 viewers per stream but I only commit to one day per week, with an occasional impromptu stream on other days depending what is going on in my real life.

Sure, things can go wrong when you first start streaming on Twitch. Your Internet or power may go out during a stream. Someone could be trolling chat looking to pick a fight or harass other users. Hardware fails and software breaks, life issues and unexpected social happenings like friends and family turning up at your house. All of these things can effect your stream and your passion for streaming but don’t let setbacks get you down. The most successful channels are the ones that deal with all that adversity but continue pushing forward and making their followers glad to be there.

The Final Word

Hard work, research and commitment is what makes a top streamer. I hope you take the time to read more of my articles on this blog and I hope you can gain some insight into streaming on Twitch.

I spend a lot of time helping new streamers and I can show you how to get more followers, but it takes some hard work. Please leave me a comment if you have any questions or topics you would like to know more about and I will reply or blog about it in the future.


New Twitch Feature: Twitch Channel Feed

Last week Twitch released an exciting new beta feature called Channel Feed. The Twitch Channel Feed in many ways is the exact same as the basic functionality of any social media platform like Twitter or Facebook. A simple way to update the people that follow you. I think this is a very nice addition to the channel page, it will allow streamers to update people about interesting news and things that are happening on the stream without having to use a traditional Twitch channel info panel. It’s much quicker and easier than creating an info panel for this kind of information plus for content like news and updates it makes much more sense.

Twitch said:

We know how important it is for broadcasters to communicate with their viewers, and Channel Feed will make it easier than ever. Your Channel Feed is a customizable space on your Channel Page where you can easily share important news, announcements, and anything else you think is relevant to your community. Channel Feed posts fully support emotes, have a generous character limit, and are easily shared to any linked social media accounts.

Should you use the Twitch Channel Feed?

I always turn on new Twitch features when they arrive and at least play with them to see if they bring any value. Personally I love this new feature. Some of the other features they have added recently in my opinion have not been so useful but I think that this is one of the best additions Twitch has made in the last 12 months.

How to enable the Twitch Channel Feed?

If you are one of the lucky few who have been given access to the new feature you should see a new area on your channel page where you will see “Channel Feed Beta” and a small on/off switch. If you do not see this on your channel page then you have not been included in the beta test.

Typically when Twitch rolls out a new feature not everybody is given access straight away. This is to limit risk on the platform and allow them to test and monitor how people are using the new feature.

In the future

I can imagine that the channel feed will see some very heavy development over the coming months. I would like to see the ability to tag other Twitch streamers for example by using @FiveManDown in a message I would like to see that text create a link to my channel. This makes shouting out and teaming up with other streamers even easier and more fun!

Currently the channel feed only supports sharing to Twitter but I can imagine the plan is to allow streamers to share content to all of their connected accounts. Currently you can can connect Twitch to Blizzard, Steam, YouTube, Facebook and Twitter.

I wonder if they will create a more open platform where you can find popular channel updates, right now people who visit your channel page can “like” a channel update in much the same way you can “like” a Facebook status update.

Twitch Channel Feed Updates

The Final Word!

The new Twitch Channel Feed is really cool and you should be using it as soon as you have access to it. I expect it to evolve over the coming months and I am excited to see what they do with it. On another note I will be starting to stream on a regular basis again and you can read more about that on my first channel feed update. Pretty cool huh?


Twitch Streamers Community

If you are looking for a community of Twitch streamers to hang out with then come and join the FollowTrain.tv Twitch streamers community. We currently use Discord to host our chat room plus free voice comms and every one is welcome to join.

What is Discord?

Discord is essentially a communication platform designed specifically for gamers. It’s like a modern day IRC client with a TeamSpeak server bundled with it! It’s awesome and it’s free!

“It’s time to ditch Skype and TeamSpeak. Discord is here. All-in-one voice and text chat for gamers that’s free, secure, and works on both your desktop and phone. Stop paying for TeamSpeak servers and hassling with Skype. Simplify your life. You’ll never go back.”

Discord IOS and Androids Apps

You can even join us using the mobile app and chat when you are not streaming or when your on the move, pop in and say “hi”, keep up to date with the latest Twitch trends and gain knowledge from other experienced streamers and Twitch partners.

How to join us on Discord

First thing you will need to do is create your free account then you can download the Discord desktop client and then you simply choose which device you use either Discord for IOS or Discord for Android.

Twitch Streamers Community on Discord

My plans for the FollowTrainTV Twitch Streamers Community Discord!

I really hope this group can grow and grow and that all streamers can learn and share new ideas in a friendly and open place. Streaming can be difficult and lonely at first, talking to yourself for hours on end with no response. Why not join us and get some support from our community of Twitch streamers!

The Final Word!

I tend to leave a final word summary at the end of every blog post I write. All I can say now is come and join us on Discord, don’t be shy everybody is welcome!


Twitch Streamers Forum

If you are a Twitch Streamer and you are looking for a Twitch streamers forum then look no further. Head over to TwitchStart.com and join the community there.

If you use Twitter then you probably already know the guys that run this forum. The forum is run by @twitchraid who is one of the biggest Twitter retweet services for Twitch Streamers.

TwitchStart.com - Twitch streamers forum

TwitchStart.com – Twitch streamers forum

I personally hang out and check posts on TwitchStart.com and you can find me there under the username FollowTrainTV.

How many people use the TwitchStart streamers forum?

They just celebrated their 600th member. They have been online around 6 months at the time of writing this article.

Things you can do at TwitchStart.com

Get some feedback about your stream.
Advertise your stream.
Ask Twitch veterans for all kinds of questions.
Discover new software and ideas connected to streaming.
Get hosted and host others.
Just hang out and make friends.

The Final Word!

If you are looking for a Twitch streamers forum then I would start with TwitchStart.com the streamer’s community. Go and create an account today and remember to introduce yourself and complete your profile page.


CPU issues when streaming and playing games

I noticed I was getting lag spikes in game after starting to stream with OBS. It was not because of my internet speed but because my CPU was using 100% of it’s processing power and killing my mad skills in CSGO. This was causing me to have some pretty horrible issues when streaming and playing games on Twitch.

How to fix CPU related issues when streaming and playing games?

The information in this post will apply to all games not just Counter-Strike Global Offensive so if you have a CPU streaming issue please read on.

I didn’t stream on Twitch much since the summer. Mostly because of other projects and because I started hitting the gym a few times a week! I formatted my PC and put Windows 10 on it plus bought myself a brand new BenQ XL2430T 144Hz monitor and I had taken my green screen down to have a huge sort out in the room I use to stream. All of these things combined meant I had destroyed my streaming setup! Putting things back together takes time but I started to do that this week.

Starting fresh

So previously I guess I had tweaked my CSGO game and my streaming settings, something I must of totally forgot about.

I tried to stream the other day and my CPU was running at 100% and causing CSGO to stutter which made me play really badly. I had to make a some tweaks again and now my CPU is running at around 90% which is perfect in my opinion because I have almost maximum performance from my PC and no issues while streaming and playing games.

Before we start tweaking

If you understand a few simple ideas then you will be able to make choices that work for you rather than just plain copying me. We all have different gaming rigs and stream different styles of games so the fixes are down to you to makes choices.

Understanding the streaming process

When you stream your capture software usually XSplit or OBS is recording your screen at the number of frames you specify, then it is resizing the dimensions of the capture as you specify and then it tries to compress it to the size rate which you specify (1800 KB/s in my case) then it sends it down the wire to Twitch.

So the more frames you have and the larger your screen resolution the larger the amount of data your CPU has to crush in order to meet your specified streaming KB/s.

On top of that CSGO is known to be a very CPU expensive game, the source engine that runs Counter-Strike uses the CPU more so than other games. Newer games pass much more of the graphic processing work to the GPU.

So in my case both CSGO and OBS are using my CPU.

You can check this by going into Task Manager, on Windows by pressing CTRL+ALT+DEL.

CPU issues when streaming and playing games on Twitch

Analyse CPU issues when streaming and playing games on Twitch!

Reducing your CPU usage is easy

You have to make some choices as to what works best for the style of games yo pay and what software and hardware you use. I outline 5 fixes below.

You may have to use all 5 of them.

Fix 1: Free up valuable CPU processing power

Press CTRL+ALT+DEL and go in to Task Manager. The first unexpected thing I noticed in Task Manager was a little program called “RzStats.Manager.exe” I saw that is was using between 10-12% of my CPU when I moved my mouse. This is because I have a Razer DeathAdder 2013 gaming mouse and when I installed the Razor Synapse 3.0 software it asked me if I would like to turn on statistic tracking for my mouse. At the time this seemed like a great idea. I soon realised that all it really does it create a heat map which is in my opinion completely useless. I disabled statistics tracking in the Razor Synapse software and then the CPU usage disappeared and I gained an extra 10% free processing power.

Analyse what is going on under the hood of your machine using Task Manager and work out what programs are hogging CPU and decide if you need them or not.

Fix 2: Reduce the amount of CPU used by the game you play

In my case CSGO is using my CPU. I like to have all my graphics settings on maximum and I still get over 150 FPS. Reducing the screen resolution of CSGO can give you more CPU if you combine that with lower graphics settings you can free up a lot of CPU power. I play 1080p and I prefer gaming in full quality so I won’t be reducing my settings in CSGO. This is my personal choice.

Adjusting the game quality settings and resolution of your game can sometimes free up CPU power, especially if your game is known for hogging CPU.

Fix 3: Stream at a lower FPS

Reduce the the number of frames per second that you record in. This is what I mentioned earlier. If you are capturing in 60 FPS you are capturing twice as much data as someone who is streaming at 30 FPS and you may have to reduce this. If you are streaming a game like Hearthstone you can probably go as low as 24 FPS without much visual concern. CSGO is a fast paced FPS and I choose to stream at 60 FPS. I can’t sacrifice this.

The lower the frame rate you stream the less CPU will be needed.

Fix 4: Downscale your stream

Downscale effectively throws away some of the data so the CPU handles less data. The less data being used the less work it does. I record my screen at 1080p and I downscale to 720p. I don’t believe many of my viewers watch my stream at full screen and even if they do 720p is still classed as HD.

The more you downscale the less CPU you will use.

Fix 5: Spend some money!!

If you have tried all of the above and still you find your games unplayable it’s time to bite the bullet and spend some money. I am serious, If you think you can be a streamer on a cheap old laptop you are probably wrong. Have a real hard look at your setup, is it really a gaming setup, more importantly can it even stream…

If all else fails go and spend some money on some new kit! 

My crappy old gaming rig

Yes I want to upgrade, I consider my setup a little old now because I have to make sacrifices to stream! I am waiting for the release of the Oculus Rift before I do any thing major with my rig. I want to be an early adapter of the VR technology that is coming and I want to stream that sh*t! Yeaaahh Buddddyy!

Motherboard: ASUS – P8P67 Deluxe
Processor: Intel Core i7-2700K CPU @ 3.50GHz
Cooling: Antec Liquid Cooling KÜHLER H2O 920
RAM: 32 GB Geil Evo 2.400 MHz DDR3 RAM
OS Hard Drives: 2 x Kingston 240GB HyperX SATA III SSD
Data Storage: 2TB Western Digital HD
Graphics: AMD Radeon HD 7800 EYEFINITY 6
Power: AMD Radeon HD 7800 EYEFINITY 6
Case: Akasa Venom Full Tower Yellow

Please look at my gaming rig spec above and if your machine is a lower spec than mine then you are probably going to have to make even more compromises than I did. if compromising is not something you want to do then you will have to simply go and spend some money on buying some better streaming kit.

The Final Word!

I left my CSGO settings on maximum plus I really want to stream at 60 FPS. My compromise comes with fix number 4, I downscale to 720p and this was enough to keep my CPU usage in check. There are some other smaller optimisations that you can make but I haven’t mentioned them because if you can’t fix your issues using fix 1, 2, 3 or 4 then I suggested you go straight to option number 5.


The best webcam for streaming on Twitch

You are here because you want to know what is the best webcam for streaming on Twitch.

When people see my stream they always ask me which webcam I use, probably because it looks so epic! When I first started streaming I made a decision that I wanted to create a stream that looked both professional and beautiful. I visited many streamers at the time, if they had really great webcam footage I simply asked them which webcam they used.

Whenever I was really blown away with the webcam footage I would get exact same answer.

Now I personally own and use the Logitech C920 – HD Pro Webcam. This is the very best webcam on the market. You don’t have to believe me, just go to Amazon and you will see that this camera is the #1 Best Seller in the webcam category.

The main reason I bought this camera was for the insane quality and high resolution. The high resolution means I get a much better result when using the green screen chroma key effect to overlay my webcam footage on my stream.

Do you really need a 1080p camera?

I think this is purely down to the question of whether or not you want to use a green screen or offer your viewers the maximum quality that you can. The higher the resolution the better the green screen chroma effect will be. You may be thinking typically that when you use a webcam on Twitch you shrink it right down to a quarter of the screen. But if you add a green screen effect then this effect is added to the webcam footage before you shrink it. If you want a crystal clear green screen effect then I suggest you buy the 1080p camera above.

Want to save some money?

In all honestly a webcam with 1080p capture may not be necessary. I record my entire screen at 1080p and then I downscale it to 720p before I stream it, my webcam takes up less than a quarter of the screen. You could argue that the resolution that the camera can capture is never really seen in my Twitch stream. But like I said earlier, I wanted the perfect green screen effect.

If you wanted to save a little bit of money or you do not want to use a green screen effect then I would recommend the little brother of the C920. I would recommend you to purchase the Logitech C270 – HD Webcam which is a 720p Widescreen webcam. This will still give you amazing quality but at less than half the price of the C920 you can see why this option may be appealing to you. I would weigh up the pro’s and con’s of both cameras and take the option that best suits your individual streaming needs.

The Final Word!

Hundreds of thousands of people who wanted great webcam footage have chosen the Logitech C920 which is why it is the number one bestseller on Amazon. If you want to save yourself some money then I would opt for the little brother and grab the Logitech C270. Either of these cameras offer great performance with a relatively low cost. I personally use the Logitech C920 and would not consider anything else right now.


The best upload settings for Twitch

I wanted to make a short video on what I think are the best upload settings for Twitch. Quite simply through trial and error over the last 1.5 years of streaming I have learned what does and doesn’t work. According to Twitch your upload settings should be calculated based on your personal bandwidth upload speed. In practice I have found this is not accurate information. I was originally using the above guide to set my Stream upload speed. I started to get complaints from viewers who simply couldn’t see my Stream. I have noticed when I am on a slow connection I experience the same black screen issue when visiting some streams.

Viewers complaining about a black screen

My basic understanding is as follows. Just because you can upload at 3500kb/s does not mean your viewers can watch your stream. If a viewer in your room has a slower connection for example 1000kb/s they simply wont see the stream. This is because they can not download quickly enough the stream you are trying to send.

A lesson to be learned

When you receive a complaint from a viewer do not instantly assume they are in the wrong. I have tried to advise many streamers that the settings they use are too high and that I can not see the stream. Often another chatter raises his voice and say’s “Well it is perfect for me!” and the streamer simply ignores my comment at which point I leave the stream because I just see a black screen. Now consider the number of people who do not even comment and simply leave the stream assuming it is broken. Remember where there is smoke there is fire, if you keep getting feedback from users that are trying to tell you something then you should pay attention and investigate the issue. Remember there is no point having crystal clear stream in ultra high definition, if people can not even watch it.

Why does Twitch recommend streamers to use such high settings?

I think the settings Twitch recommends are accurate based on video quality alone, if you want to stream 1080p at 60 fps I think for optimum quality you should be using 3500kb/s as recommend by Twitch. I also believe that perhaps when creating these articles Twitch is taking into account that there is a ‘Video Quality Option’ on the Twitch video player where users can adjust your stream quality and set it to either Source, High, Medium, Low and Mobile. But new and un-partnered streamers do not always get this luxury all of the time. You will probably not have the ‘Video Quality’ option on your stream.

Video quality settings can be found on the bottom right of the video player but new streamers may not have them.

Video quality settings can be found on the bottom right of the video player but new streamers may not have the option and their viewers are forced to watch at Source quality.

Best upload settings for Twitch Partners

If you are already a partner then you will always have the ‘Player Options’ popup and in that case it makes sense to use the recommended upload settings. If you have the ability to stream at 3500kb/s then it makes sense to do so because users on slower connections can adjust the rate at which data is sent to them.

Best upload settings for non Twitch Partners

I really believe there is a sweet spot at around 1600-2000kb/s where you can have great quality and the largest number of possible viewers. It is a happy medium between quality and maximum viewership.

The best upload settings for Twitch

Adjusting the upload settings for Twitch in OBS.

The Final Word!

If your a partner by all means you should be using the maximum upload speed that you can. If you are new to twitch and are not partnered I believe you should lower your upload setting to around 1800kb/s. If people can not watch your stream you will have less viewers, less chatters and a harder time making it big on Twitch. Drop the upload speed and once you become partnered you can stream in ultra high quality.


How many people can you invite to a Steam group per day?

The simple question with a less than simple answer. Steam groups in my opinion is one of the very best places where you can work to build new followers and viewers for your Twitch channel. The Steam community is a place where you will find your target audience, Gamers. Gamers are the people most likely to come and watch you on Twitch and Steam has literally millions of Gamers you can access.

If you do not have a Steam group then I suggest you start one. I am working on another article at the moment where I will show you how best to do that. I currently own 4 Steam groups.

I wanted to know how many people I can invite to a Steam group per day, what are the Steam group invite limits? It seems at a certain point the invites you send from the group no longer send. You can check this by reviewing your groups history. This is frustrating, but there is obvious reasons for this, for example limiting spam on the Steam network.

Google to the rescue…. or not!

I googled this question, but there is no real answers out there. I just found lots of conflicting wishy-washy opinions. The two best articles I found on the topic can be found on the Steam forums and Reddit. Neither of the posts answer the question. So I set out to discover for myself and see just how many people I can invite each day, per group.

What I did…

I have 4 Steam groups which I have been growing over the last year. I haven’t sent any invites in the past few months. I started with my main group and I invited as many people as possible, once the invites stopped being sent from that group I moved on to my second, third and fourth group. So each day for the last 10 days I have sent as many invites as Steam would allow.

The Numbers and The Steam Groups

Below are some tables detailing exactly how many invites I was able to send on each day for each group. I have included the actual group size in terms of number of current members and all of these groups are at least 6 months old so they are all quite similar in size and age. As you can see the results are a little strange, the number of invites sent goes up and down per day for no obvious reasons. I was inviting people at a rate of 3-4 people per minute and only working with one group at a time.

Steam group: FiveManDown
Members in group: 1376
Total invites sent in 10 days: 776
Average Invites sent per day: 77

Date Invites Sent
September 8th 388
September 9th 6
September 10th 0
September 11th 170
September 12th 61
September 13th 0
September 14th 0
September 15th 0
September 16th 151
September 17th 0

Steam group: Skins Club
Members in group: 3833
Total invites sent in 10 days: 702
Average Invites sent per day: 70

Date Invites Sent
September 8th 4
September 9th 439
September 10th 46
September 11th 131
September 12th 51
September 13th 0
September 14th 0
September 15th 0
September 16th 31
September 17th 0

Steam group: Twitch CSGO Giveaway Alliance
Members in group: 907
Total invites sent in 10 days: 633
Average Invites sent per day: 63

Date Invites Sent
September 8th 0
September 9th 0
September 10th 0
September 11th 101
September 12th 149
September 13th 0
September 14th 44
September 15th 220
September 16th 119
September 17th 0

Steam group: FMD CSGO Giveaways
Members in group: 545
Total invites sent in 10 days: 589
Average Invites sent per day: 59

Date Invites Sent
September 8th 0
September 9th 0
September 10th 0
September 11th 0
September 12th 1
September 13th 378
September 14th 122
September 15th 0
September 16th 66
September 17th 22

Any conclusive findings?

It seems that there is a daily limit across all groups. For example my fourth group did not gain the ability to send invites till much later in the test perhaps after my other groups had maxed out on invites. It would appear that you can send around 270 invites per day.

Total invites sent in 10 days: 2700
Average Invites sent per day: 270

Date Invites Sent
September 8th 392
September 9th 445
September 10th 46
September 11th 402
September 12th 262
September 13th 378
September 14th 166
September 15th 220
September 16th 367
September 17th 22

The Final Word

The Answer: 270 Invites Per Day! It looks like you can invite about 270 people per day across multiple groups. Somewhere between 250-450 people can be invited per day for a single group, but not all groups can be maxed out every single day. If you have multiple groups you can only max out one group per day. I still believe it is better to have more groups than less especially if you are trying to gain followers for your community or Twitch channel.