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Twitch Tutorials and Streaming Advice

Posts Tagged ‘get twitch followers’

Start streaming on Twitch – 7 Tips

In just over one and a half years of streaming on Twitch, I’ve gained nearly 20,000 followers (Which you can check here on my channel). I wanted to outline what I believe are the most important things you should be doing to maximize your potential when you start streaming on Twitch. Getting people to your stream is hard enough, keeping them there is even harder.

I have spent many hours reading and learning about streaming and the Twitch platform. I have also learned from personal experiences and the experience of others. I run followtrain.tv and I run a Twitch community where we discuss Twitch related topics. It would be fair to say I know a thing or two about streaming.

Here are 7 things to keep in mind when you are just start streaming on Twitch.

1. Make sure your internet connection is solid

You don’t need to run out and buy a dedicated T1 line when you start streaming on Twitch, but you definitely need to have a decent cable broadband or fibre optic connection. The number one thing you need to do is be able to stream and with a bad internet connection you will end up with a totally black screen or a laggy viewing experience. I already outlined in another post what the best settings to use when streaming, so make sure you check that out.

2. Get a decent microphone

People visit Twitch to watch and listen to people playing games. If your commentary is inaudible due to a low-quality microphone, you won’t get many followers or viewers. You don’t need a recording studio quality mic but you do need to be sure that your voice is clear and louder than your music or in-game sound, with little to no static or hum.

Try and get a microphone with built in noise reduction in case something is going on behind you, perhaps you live near a busy road and the windows are open because of the heat outside. These small sounds will be heard on your stream as just background noise which can really irritate people. I keep an updated list of what I consider to be the Best Hardware for Twitch.

3. Get some custom graphics and a decent overlay

Your channel and brand is important for people to remember you, starting at just $5 you can get custom graphic design service. You will create your HUD (Heads up Display) in your streaming software, something like OBS or xSplit. Personally, I do mine with OBS. The idea is to make sure that your stream looks good and is viewer friendly. There are a ton of streamers out there, so the viewer experience is going to be what sets you apart.

For example you could create a border around your webcam that tells something about your personality or your favorite game. It is also important that pop up notifications give praise where it is due. When someone gives you a donation or follows you you should have a pop up or something cool happening.

When viewers see a celebration over even the smallest of donations, they are more likely to donate a few dollars as well. Make an even bigger celebration for your top donors. Remember, people are throwing money at you for doing something you would probably be doing anyway, so make sure they know how grateful you are.

4. A HD webcam is a must

Okay, so maybe Lirik doesn’t use a webcam… but you are not Lirik and you didn’t start streaming nearly five years ago when he did. Do yourself a favour and buy a decent webcam. There are plenty of streamers who don’t use a webcam, this is true, they also they don’t have many followers or viewers. If you want to be one of them random unknown faces then be my guest but it wont help you grow on Twitch.

People like to see faces, even if you think you are the ugliest person on earth I promise you beauty is in the eye of the beholder. It’s just nice to have a face to go with the voice and the username, so don’t be shy.

I was simply amazed how much people did not troll me when I first used a webcam. Most people are genuinely friendly. We all got bullied a little school for one thing or another and that fear is still with us but in my experience on Twitch it’s not an issue. Really you should try it once or twice and I promise you wont regret it, in fact you will enjoy streaming even more. Yes it feels awkward at first and maybe you need to get comfortable with speaking before turning on the camera but sooner or later you need a webcam.

You want to be able to stream and record in high definition a 720p camera is the minimum, but a 1080p is always preferred. Many viewers, when looking for a new channel to watch, won’t even click on one unless they see a picture-in-picture cam. Read more about what I think is the best webcam for Twitch.

5. Interact with your viewers

There is only so much that hardware and software can do for you, and there are a ton of great players out there. After that, your persona has to carry you. You will truly begin to stand apart from the crowd and gain a following when people see your personality, and that means interacting. Gaining followers and regular viewers is really about being entertaining.

Once you have hundreds or thousands of followers, you may not be able to greet everyone by name, but at least when you are starting out, don’t let people slip in and out of your channel without even being acknowledged. Say something like, “Hi [username], welcome to the stream!” Try to answer questions that viewers ask, and even ask some of your own and check out the responses. Yes, you need to pay attention to the game too, but the game isn’t following you or making donations, so put your viewers first.

Don’t argue in the chat box. If someone is really being obnoxious, mute them quickly and move on. Do not waste time or energy with trolls, insta-ban them and forget about it, they will move on to someone else who will entertain their trolling efforts.

6. Get a chat bot for your stream

I’m not talking about view bots—those are a good way to get your channel banned. If you are a regular Twitch viewer, you probably already know what a chat bot is. Chat bots basically serve one purpose—they keep the chat box safe for you and your followers and provide additional interaction functionality.

They can ban people for saying certain words, they can tell users what music you are currently playing and they can even help you run giveaways and answer common questions for you. You can also give certain moderators the ability to add commands to some bots to further reduce the amount of work you have to do when streaming.

My personal favorite is DeepBot. DeepBot is not free and can be overwhelming at first, start with something like Moobot or Nightbot and consider DeepBot later on.

7. Be consistent and persistent

When you first start streaming on Twitch, setting up a schedule for streaming is in my opinion the single most important thing you can do if you want to build regular viewers. How do you expect to get regular viewers if you cant even be regular yourself?

Being consistent allows you to get repeat viewers rather than just competing for whoever happens to be on when you decide to stream. Don’t give up if your stream doesn’t take off straight away. Sometimes it takes a while for people to get to know you and decide that your channel is more fun or exciting than the other channels that are currently open.

Keep learning and striving to become a better streamer, watch other peoples streams and figure out why they have so many viewers. What are they doing differently and ask yourself how can you be more like them?

In my personal experience, last year when I had a three day a week schedule, I was able to build my viewers up to an average of around 70-80 people per stream. I took six months off in the Autumn of 2015 and when I returned I struggled to get just 10 viewers. At the time of writing this article I am now back averaging 30 viewers per stream but I only commit to one day per week, with an occasional impromptu stream on other days depending what is going on in my real life.

Sure, things can go wrong when you first start streaming on Twitch. Your Internet or power may go out during a stream. Someone could be trolling chat looking to pick a fight or harass other users. Hardware fails and software breaks, life issues and unexpected social happenings like friends and family turning up at your house. All of these things can effect your stream and your passion for streaming but don’t let setbacks get you down. The most successful channels are the ones that deal with all that adversity but continue pushing forward and making their followers glad to be there.

The Final Word

Hard work, research and commitment is what makes a top streamer. I hope you take the time to read more of my articles on this blog and I hope you can gain some insight into streaming on Twitch.

I spend a lot of time helping new streamers and I can show you how to get more followers, but it takes some hard work. Please leave me a comment if you have any questions or topics you would like to know more about and I will reply or blog about it in the future.


How many people can you invite to a Steam group per day?

The simple question with a less than simple answer. Steam groups in my opinion is one of the very best places where you can work to build new followers and viewers for your Twitch channel. The Steam community is a place where you will find your target audience, Gamers. Gamers are the people most likely to come and watch you on Twitch and Steam has literally millions of Gamers you can access.

If you do not have a Steam group then I suggest you start one. I am working on another article at the moment where I will show you how best to do that. I currently own 4 Steam groups.

I wanted to know how many people I can invite to a Steam group per day, what are the Steam group invite limits? It seems at a certain point the invites you send from the group no longer send. You can check this by reviewing your groups history. This is frustrating, but there is obvious reasons for this, for example limiting spam on the Steam network.

Google to the rescue…. or not!

I googled this question, but there is no real answers out there. I just found lots of conflicting wishy-washy opinions. The two best articles I found on the topic can be found on the Steam forums and Reddit. Neither of the posts answer the question. So I set out to discover for myself and see just how many people I can invite each day, per group.

What I did…

I have 4 Steam groups which I have been growing over the last year. I haven’t sent any invites in the past few months. I started with my main group and I invited as many people as possible, once the invites stopped being sent from that group I moved on to my second, third and fourth group. So each day for the last 10 days I have sent as many invites as Steam would allow.

The Numbers and The Steam Groups

Below are some tables detailing exactly how many invites I was able to send on each day for each group. I have included the actual group size in terms of number of current members and all of these groups are at least 6 months old so they are all quite similar in size and age. As you can see the results are a little strange, the number of invites sent goes up and down per day for no obvious reasons. I was inviting people at a rate of 3-4 people per minute and only working with one group at a time.

Steam group: FiveManDown
Members in group: 1376
Total invites sent in 10 days: 776
Average Invites sent per day: 77

Date Invites Sent
September 8th 388
September 9th 6
September 10th 0
September 11th 170
September 12th 61
September 13th 0
September 14th 0
September 15th 0
September 16th 151
September 17th 0

Steam group: Skins Club
Members in group: 3833
Total invites sent in 10 days: 702
Average Invites sent per day: 70

Date Invites Sent
September 8th 4
September 9th 439
September 10th 46
September 11th 131
September 12th 51
September 13th 0
September 14th 0
September 15th 0
September 16th 31
September 17th 0

Steam group: Twitch CSGO Giveaway Alliance
Members in group: 907
Total invites sent in 10 days: 633
Average Invites sent per day: 63

Date Invites Sent
September 8th 0
September 9th 0
September 10th 0
September 11th 101
September 12th 149
September 13th 0
September 14th 44
September 15th 220
September 16th 119
September 17th 0

Steam group: FMD CSGO Giveaways
Members in group: 545
Total invites sent in 10 days: 589
Average Invites sent per day: 59

Date Invites Sent
September 8th 0
September 9th 0
September 10th 0
September 11th 0
September 12th 1
September 13th 378
September 14th 122
September 15th 0
September 16th 66
September 17th 22

Any conclusive findings?

It seems that there is a daily limit across all groups. For example my fourth group did not gain the ability to send invites till much later in the test perhaps after my other groups had maxed out on invites. It would appear that you can send around 270 invites per day.

Total invites sent in 10 days: 2700
Average Invites sent per day: 270

Date Invites Sent
September 8th 392
September 9th 445
September 10th 46
September 11th 402
September 12th 262
September 13th 378
September 14th 166
September 15th 220
September 16th 367
September 17th 22

The Final Word

The Answer: 270 Invites Per Day! It looks like you can invite about 270 people per day across multiple groups. Somewhere between 250-450 people can be invited per day for a single group, but not all groups can be maxed out every single day. If you have multiple groups you can only max out one group per day. I still believe it is better to have more groups than less especially if you are trying to gain followers for your community or Twitch channel.


How I picked up over 400 Twitch followers in just 4 days!

I wanted to share what I did over the last few days to capitalize on an opportunity that happens several times a year. If you play a game that has a large e-sports event you may be able to gain some extra followers just by watching Twitch and being part of the event on Twitch. I picked up over 400 followers in the last few days and I didn’t even stream once.

ESL One Cologne 2015 just happened and we saw millions of gamers tune into the event. I mostly play Counter-Strike Global Offensive so I will speak about my experience with that but if you play one of the other big games such as Dota2, Battlefield 4, Hearthstone or League of Legends then there is similar e-sports events which you may be able to capitalize on in a similar way.

Team EnVyUs - Photo by Helena Kristiansson

Team EnVyUs – Photo by Helena Kristiansson

Getting seen by over 800,000 Twitch viewers!

The value of being seen by over 800k viewers on Twitch is priceless! But the cost is just $6.99. Warren Buffet arguably one of the greatest investors ever said “Price is what you pay. Value is what you get.” Remember this advice when trying to grow your Twitch channel because some small economic commitments can mean big rewards.

The Counter-Strike event was broadcasted on several official live streams, I subscribed to the Official ESL CSGO Twitch channel during the event. This costs $6.99 for one month. This means that I can speak in the chat room when the room is in subscriber only mode which is the case for all of the games when they are live. During this time there is hundreds of thousands of people watching Twitch and reading the Twitch chat. This is where you can gain some serious exposure, attention and followers.

Don’t get banned!

MODS can be super aggressive especially during live events, be careful what you say and how you behave! Remember that hundreds of thousands of people are watching you and what you type in chat. Don’t be a d*ck, your trying to gain the love and respect of the community. Be helpful towards people and answer questions, you will get some private whispers from people who are not subscribers. At times it can be too much to deal with, you will have alot of people messaging you and some of these people will send you some new follows.

Do not post links, if you do mention “giveaways” or ask people to “follow you” be warned you may get a ban. I had several small bans over the weekend between 60 and 600 seconds. When this happens I just calm down, usually it is because I am over talking and over dominating the chat room.

All the Top Streamers are there!

Another thing you will notice is that all of the top streamers on Twitch will be present at the event, they love the game, they love Twitch and they love to be part of the huge pro events. You are now mixing with the Twitch VIP’s.

On a Subconscious level

Another thing which I think happens and makes a huge difference is some people will say to me “I recognize your name” or “Did we play together recently?”. I think this is because I am present in these large chat room events. My name is being seen and is going into peoples minds on a subconscious level, a few weeks from now they may stumble across my stream and instantly they will think they know me from somewhere or perhaps they even remember me from a large esports event.

Remember to Unsubscribe

A word of warning a Twitch subscription will auto renew, so if you are not interested in running your subscription for several months make sure you unsubscribe during the event or straight after the event or you will get charged $6.99 every single month. You can manage your Twitch subscriptions here.

The Final Word!

I have subscribed to each of the last four major CSGO events and each time I pickup between 100 and 500 new followers. This time round I gained just over 400 Twitch followers. This will work on smaller scale events also where perhaps there is only 40,000 to 100,000 people watching but you will get some followers by simply being part of the event on Twitch and you will be growing your name and presence in the community.


The best Twitch bot? Quite simply DeepBot

Trust me on this one. There is one sure way for a new streamer to get viewers, regulars and followers. One of the hardest things for any streamer to do is to get the active viewer count up. The easiest way to do this is with a coin bot.

Coin Bots

They come with many names, coin bot, token bot, loyalty bot, points bot, reward bot. Essentially they are all the same. A coin bot will sit in your chat room and hand out virtual coins to your viewers. Typically viewers will get rewarded with 1 coin per minute that they view your stream. This causes people to idle in your channel and collect coins, which gives you a higher viewer count and that puts you higher up the Twitch channel page. The higher you are, the more people visit the room and the more followers and viewers you gain. I typically have a minimum of 20 viewers in my channel even on a really quiet day and some of them are even AFK but I simply don’t care because I am higher up on that Twitch channel page which means fresh people are now coming into my chat room. This is how a coin bot works and this is why savvy steamers use them.

Rewarding your regular viewers

There has to be some sort of incentive attached to the collection of coins. If you run giveaways or do something for every x number of followers a coin bot can really help you get those regular viewers to stay in your chat.

No Money for giveaways?

No Problem! You can invent all kinds of ways to reward your regulars. Viewer games, sing them a song, do 10 pushups. I know not every streamer can afford to run giveaways, but giveaways don’t have to be huge amounts of money.

I personally giveaway Counter-Strike Global Offensive skins on my channel worth around 0.35€ for every 15 followers. It doesn’t break the bank. Knowing that I have around 11k followers I have easily spent over 250€ in the last year. This sounds like a huge amount amount of money but it’s really only about 20€ per month and I stream 2-3 times a week. Twitch is my Hobby, I love streaming and 20€ a month for a hobby isn’t too much to spend. I also really enjoy doing the giveaways and it gives my stream a little something extra.

Coin bot crashes – Problems with some coin bots

I have tried 3 different coin bots, I wont mention the others here but I had some issues in the past. One time I was giving away an AK47 Redline and had around 200 active viewers in my chat and my coin bot crashed. It was a nightmare as I had been preparing this giveaway for weeks and in the last minute it all failed. I looked ridiculous.

DeepBot to the rescue!

Continuing from what I said earlier I have had over 450 viewers in my chat at once all interacting with DeepBot and it has never crashed on me once. This is the only coin bot that I have found that can be trusted with large viewer numbers.

DeepBot’s other features

I would struggle to write a blog post about all of DeepBot’s other features, this bot is all singing and dancing. It is constantly being improved and updates are free of charge. Some of it’s other features include: Raffles, Auto Timers, Channel Commands, Viewer Games, Voting, Bankheist, Music, Mini Games, Gambling, User Administration, Drag Race the list goes on and on…

best-twitch-bot

best-bot-for-twitch

I don’t think a single other bot has a feature which doesn’t come included in DeepBot. If your using multiple bots it’s time to switch. DeepBot does it all. Deepbot is the best Twitch bot.

The Final Word!

DeepBot is currently in the beta stage and to get it set up and running you will have to donate $10. But this is a small price to pay for such a great Twitch bot. If your looking to get higher viewer counts then I really think you should invest in DeepBot today.


Paying for Retweets – A waste of Money?

I wanted to share a recent experience I had, I have been using Twitter to see what kind of user engagement I can create. I am looking at different ways to see if I can get new followers, retweets and favourites on Twitter and then can I get these people to follow me on my Twitch.

Creating a Tweet to get Retweets

I have done this a few times. Create a nice graphic and give people a good reason to retweet your message and you will get lots of retweets. This is a recent tweet I did, where I am giving away 2 x Bloodhound passes for Counter-Strike Global Offensive. I find this works well, giveaway tweets always work for me.

To create a good giveaway tweet I tell them what I have and I tell them what they need to do to get it. They need to retweet the message and they need to follow me on Twitch.

I have picked up approximately 30-40 new Twitch followers with this tweet within a few days of tweeting it.

Paying for Retweets

I found a service called TweetEnterprise where you can find user accounts of people that can retweet your message or even tweet a message for you for cold hard cash!

I spent a total of $11 and in theory my tweet was retweeted to around 3,468,827 Twitter users. I used these accounts below, I have included the number of followers they have and the cost of a single retweet from each account.

@DjKingAssassin – 3,311,591 – $8
@GaminRTs – 102,378 – $2
@ShoutGamers – 54,858 – $1

After I paid, I saw the retweets, it is in no way a fake service. I spent the money and the tweet was retweeted quite clearly by these accounts above. But I saw nothing to suggest that it created any more interest in my giveaway. I can only assume that these accounts are so diluted with messages that the people following them are either zombie accounts or they just did not like my tweet. I picked the accounts above because two of them seem to be gaming related and the other one was the largest account on the TweetEnterprise site.

I saw no real increase in retweets, favourites, tweets or follows… Nothing… Not a thing… I was disappointed. It is a huge shame because I would use such a service again if it had worked. I may try again a second time with a different approach or maybe using some of the smaller cheaper twitter retweet accounts.

The Final Word!

I don’t know if paying for retweets actually works, for me I just tried this service once and it didn’t have any real effect on my already quite successful tweet. For the record this tweet had around 110 retweets before I paid my $11 and at the time of writing this article it had 126 retweets and 44 favourites.


Using Twitter to get Twitch followers

I wanted to share with you some of the things I do to get Twitch followers using my Twitter account. I will show you my own techniques that I use to grow my Twitter followers and my Twitch followers.

Get it RIGHT! Setup your Twitter bio like a BOSS!

The first thing you need to realise is that most people wont just find you by accident. You need to help people discover your Twitch channel and you need to tell them to follow you!

Visit my Twitter page and read my bio (Hey, send me a follow while you are there!), you will notice I use the website field to promote my YouTube channel and I use my personal bio to tell people that I giveaway CSGO skins and that it happens very often. Also I include a link to my Twitch channel because people are probably to lazy to type it.

Get Twitch FollowersMy bio is designed to lure people to my Twitch channel and I encourage them to follow me, it really WORKS!

Remember not to lie on your bio, If you are not giving away skins don’t pretend you are. Tell them something else which is cool and true about your channel. I am a CSGO streamer and CSGO players love skins, so this works great for me!

Now your Twitter bio is ready and you can generate interest in your Twitter page!

Archie.co auto favorites tweets!

I used to use TwitFox, but that service was recently shut down because it seems that Twitter doesn’t like services that auto favourite or retweet tweets. My theory in life is people get rich by exploiting loop holes while they exist. I don’t know how long Archie.co will be online but right now it generates me between 25 and 50 new Twitter followers every single day.

Archie.co searches Twitter for specific types of tweets which contain specific keywords and then it favourites them for you. This generates an email from Twitter to the user and other types of notification. Then hopefully they will visit your Twitter profile and like your bio, then follow you on Twitch. It’s a numbers game but it works!

You choose the keyword and archie.co does the rest. If you play World of Warcraft perhaps you can make archie.co look for tweets about “WOW” or “MMO Games”. This helps find people that are interested in the type of games you stream.

Unfollowers.me creates an auto-responder!

If they haven’t already followed you on Twitch after reading your bio, you can now send them a private message via Twitter telling them about your Twitch channel. Hopefully now they will follow you on Twitch.

Go to Unfollowers.me and after you login via Twitter visit the “Automate” tab. From here you need to turn on “Welcome DM” messages.

Create a good welcome message, include your Twitch URL and tell them again why to follow you. Here is my welcome message:

TY for follow, I do lots of CSGO Skin give-aways, Why not follow me on Twitch? http://www.twitch.tv/fivemandown

Now you are fully automated, archie.co is generating traffic to your page and unfollowers.me is telling people about your Twitch channel. This is how you can use Twitter to get Twitch followers!

The Final Word!

BOOM! You are officially a BOSS! As your Twitter grows you also have the ability to send cool tweets to your followers and continue to reap the rewards of your hard work! Remember people need all the help you can give them when it comes to following you, make it easy, make it worth it and be clever about your automation so your social media can work through the night and create interest in your Twitch channel!

Please leave me a comment below – I would love to hear how you have used this article to grow your channel or how you have tweaked this method to get even more Twitch followers!