Twitch Tutorials and Streaming Advice

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Twitch Streamers Community

If you are looking for a community of Twitch streamers to hang out with then come and join the Twitch streamers community. We currently use Discord to host our chat room plus free voice comms and every one is welcome to join.

What is Discord?

Discord is essentially a communication platform designed specifically for gamers. It’s like a modern day IRC client with a TeamSpeak server bundled with it! It’s awesome and it’s free!

“It’s time to ditch Skype and TeamSpeak. Discord is here. All-in-one voice and text chat for gamers that’s free, secure, and works on both your desktop and phone. Stop paying for TeamSpeak servers and hassling with Skype. Simplify your life. You’ll never go back.”

Discord IOS and Androids Apps

You can even join us using the mobile app and chat when you are not streaming or when your on the move, pop in and say “hi”, keep up to date with the latest Twitch trends and gain knowledge from other experienced streamers and Twitch partners.

How to join us on Discord

First thing you will need to do is create your free account then you can download the Discord desktop client and then you simply choose which device you use either Discord for IOS or Discord for Android.

Twitch Streamers Community on Discord

My plans for the FollowTrainTV Twitch Streamers Community Discord!

I really hope this group can grow and grow and that all streamers can learn and share new ideas in a friendly and open place. Streaming can be difficult and lonely at first, talking to yourself for hours on end with no response. Why not join us and get some support from our community of Twitch streamers!

The Final Word!

I tend to leave a final word summary at the end of every blog post I write. All I can say now is come and join us on Discord, don’t be shy everybody is welcome!

Top 10 most popular games on Twitch

Your probably wondering “What are the most popular games on Twitch?”, Well I have the definitive answer for you! You can easily see what the most popular games are on Twitch at at given moment. You simply visit the main games page and you will see in real time what games are currently the most popular. But this only shows you a small snippet of the story and often when a game is new lots of people will be playing it!

At the end of each Year Twitch release a retrospective and for the purpose of this article I feel this is the best place to check for the real data on such a question. Below is a list of the 10 most popular games on Twitch for the entire year of 2015. The list is in order and represents the games which streamed the most minutes on the platform. Without further hesitation lets get in to the list!

1. League of Legends

League of Legends

League of Legends (LoL) is an online battle arena game that takes place in real-time. League is one of the world’s largest esports games and was developed by Riot Games. As of 2014, the game had 67 million monthly players and over 27 million daily players. At any given time, upwards of 7.5 million people are playing at once. A standard game consists of two teams of 5 champions competing to destroy the other team’s nexus while leveling up in an RPG style. The action is fast, furious and intense making this the perfect spectator eSport. League of Legeds wins the number one spot on the most popular games on Twitch list.

2. Counter-Strike: Global Offensive (CS: GO)

Counter-Strike: Global Offensive (CS: GO)

Next up another massive eSports game that needs no introduction. CS:GO is the 4th iteration in the Counter-Strike series. It is a 5 on 5 team-based online FPS (first-person shooter) game that takes place in real-time. Rated mature, this game pits terrorists (Ts) versus counter-terrorists (CTs) in a realistic shootout involving various options for gameplay. Typically you will see people playing in a game that will last around 90 minutes where the first team to get 16 rounds will take the victory. A friend of mine once said that “CS:GO was the best $7 he ever spent!” and I really cant argue with that. It draws in thousands of viewers on Twitch every single day and shows no sign of going away soon.

3. Dota 2

Dota 2

Dota 2 is another battle style arena game involving multiple combatants in real-time play and in many ways is similar to League of Legends. Developed by the Valve Corporation the same company that made CS:GO, Dota 2 is free-to-play and boasts over 1 million simultaneous users. Characters have unique abilities and scale during each battle — collecting gold, experience, and items throughout the game. In 2015 a prize pool of $18 million at the game’s main annual tournament set an all-time high for the eSports scene and remains one of the most likely ways to make money from gaming online.

4. Hearthstone: Heroes of Warcraft

Hearthstone: Heroes of Warcraft

Next up we have Hearthstone the card-based strategy game developed by Blizzard Entertainment. Head-to-head Arena play allows players to face off against each other using pre selected decks of cards. There are now more than 40 million Hearthstone players around the globe. Ranked battles allow players to gain monthly prizes and strive to become legendary ranked. The top 100 legendary ranked players at the end of each month receive world championship points (WCPs) that can help them to qualify for the annual championship competition. The game is free but t allows users to purchase card packs in order to rapidly increase players card collections for developing gameplay decks. Single player modes can also be unlocked to help players earn cards that are not available in some of the purchasable packs. Again I think one of the things that draws viewers on with this game is the high level of competition involved.

5. Minecraft


Minecraft allows users to build and create in a 3D block environment. Players explore the world they are helping to create, they gather resources, craft new tools, and even engage in combat. Various game modes exist that allow players to outlast each other in a multiplayer survival game or enjoy a creative mode which provides unlimited resources for users to design anything they can imagine. An award winning game, Microsoft purchased the intellectual property from Mojang in 2014 for the sum of 2.5 billion USD.

6. H1Z1


The point of H1Z1 is to survive the zombie apocalypse—a popular theme in modern entertainment. It takes place in a future dystopia where zombies have resulted from a mutated virus called H1Z1. The game is a massively multiplayer game, meaning that all users exist in the same world. Cooperation is encouraged, creating a sense of community among many users. Teamwork and trading are vital aspects of survival when encountering everything from zombies to wild animals. Most people on Twitch play in the Battle Royal mode which is a huge fight to the death and only ends when there is one play left.

7. Destiny


Destiny is an FPS (first-person shooter) brought to you by Bungle and Activision, the same guys that made the massively successful Halo series. Destiny is a sci-fi game in which users share a world and team up. There are player-versus-player options besides the team objective modes. The game takes place on a future Earth, ridden with aliens, as well as on various worlds where the player is charged to wipe out the alien nemesis before reinforcements can reach the Earth. The launch of the game in 2014 set retail records with more than half a billion USD in retail sales on the release day.

8. World of Tanks

World of Tanks

World of Tanks is a free-to-play online game that takes place in a multiplayer format. There are also premium game features available for a fee. PvP gameplay is the focus, and users compete against each other in various types of tanks. There are more than 400 different kinds, each based on a real type of tank developed during the 20th century. Users can choose their favorite tank from their home country or select a type of tank produced anywhere in the world. This game entered the world of eSports at the 2012 World Cyber Games. This game draws some pretty big numbers on the Twitch platform.

9. World of Warcraft

World of Warcraft

WoW, World of Warcraft is an MMORPG from Blizzard Entertainment, and is the oldest of today’s favorite games having been released in 1704. The world of WoW takes place four years after the events of Blizzard’s previous iteration of the game, Warcraft III: The Frozen Throne. Six expansions have been released over the past decade. There are more than 5.5 million subscribers, making WoW the world’s top MMORPG. It is also the highest-grossing game in history. A World of Warcraft movie will be released in June of 2016 under the title Warcraft and will no doubt increase interest in the game, adding to the number of players and spectators on Twitch.

10. FIFA 15


FIFA 15 is the ultimate football/soccer simulator. Electronic Arts released the game in 2014, and it received great reviews from game critics. Thanks to the global popularity of football/soccer, this has become the most popular sports game for online play and viewing. Each year, EA releases a new version of the popular game with upgraded AI and updated team rosters, meeting with immediate success from fans of the franchise. No other sports simulation game attains the same eSports attention as FIFA.

The Final Word!

So there we have it the 10 most popular games on Twitch in 2015 according to Twitch! One of the key things that I take away from this list is that each of these games has a huge esports potential they are all massively competitive and have a massive online multiplayer style of play. Each of these games offer something unique that simply draws us to play them which then draws people to watch others play.

Twitch Streamers Forum

If you are a Twitch Streamer and you are looking for a Twitch streamers forum then look no further. Head over to and join the community there.

If you use Twitter then you probably already know the guys that run this forum. The forum is run by @twitchraid who is one of the biggest Twitter retweet services for Twitch Streamers. - Twitch streamers forum – Twitch streamers forum

I personally hang out and check posts on and you can find me there under the username FollowTrainTV.

How many people use the TwitchStart streamers forum?

They just celebrated their 600th member. They have been online around 6 months at the time of writing this article.

Things you can do at

Get some feedback about your stream.
Advertise your stream.
Ask Twitch veterans for all kinds of questions.
Discover new software and ideas connected to streaming.
Get hosted and host others.
Just hang out and make friends.

The Final Word!

If you are looking for a Twitch streamers forum then I would start with the streamer’s community. Go and create an account today and remember to introduce yourself and complete your profile page.

A look back at the Twitch numbers in 2015

The Twitch official blog posted a rather nice look back retrospective for 2015. I wanted to highlight some of the Twitch numbers that I found interesting around the numbers that Twitch boasts.

How many people watch Twitch?

Twitch reported that there is an average of more than half a million concurrent viewers on Twitch. That’s right more than 550,000 people are probably watching Twitch right now while you read this article. Streamers broadcasted 241,441,823,059 total minutes last year. The infrastructure behind Twitch is impressive to say the least! They had a peek of 2,098,529 viewers on August the 23rd during a single weekend when both ESL One: Cologne 2015 and the League of Legends NA LCS Finals both took place.

How many people broadcast on Twitch?

With an average of 1.7 million broadcasters streaming every month that is a huge amount of gamers streaming on the Twitch platform they had a concurrent peek of 35,610 broadcasters all streaming at once in November 2015.

How many partners does Twitch have?

Twitch reported that they have in total 13,476 partners, these are Streamers with that magic sub button.

How do people watch Twitch?

Most people watch Twitch on a laptop or desktop computer around 56% of their viewers with mobile at 35% leaving consoles lagging behind at just 7%. Twitch mobile and tablet app’s reported having over 1,000,000 downloads last year.

How many messages per minute does Twitch handle?

There was a total of 9,169,726,092 messages sent in 2015 that’s 17,446 messages per minute. That’s a lot of Kappa emotes!

The Final Word!

Twitch is an impressive platform with a huge user base. I would argue that Twitch is the home of gaming! It brings the community together in a fun and interesting way and I am proud to be a part of the Twitch history. If you are interested in the Twitch history you can get a really good insight by visiting the Twitch 2014 Retrospective and the Twitch 2013 Retrospective.

CPU issues when streaming and playing games

I noticed I was getting lag spikes in game after starting to stream with OBS. It was not because of my internet speed but because my CPU was using 100% of it’s processing power and killing my mad skills in CSGO. This was causing me to have some pretty horrible issues when streaming and playing games on Twitch.

How to fix CPU related issues when streaming and playing games?

The information in this post will apply to all games not just Counter-Strike Global Offensive so if you have a CPU streaming issue please read on.

I didn’t stream on Twitch much since the summer. Mostly because of other projects and because I started hitting the gym a few times a week! I formatted my PC and put Windows 10 on it plus bought myself a brand new BenQ XL2430T 144Hz monitor and I had taken my green screen down to have a huge sort out in the room I use to stream. All of these things combined meant I had destroyed my streaming setup! Putting things back together takes time but I started to do that this week.

Starting fresh

So previously I guess I had tweaked my CSGO game and my streaming settings, something I must of totally forgot about.

I tried to stream the other day and my CPU was running at 100% and causing CSGO to stutter which made me play really badly. I had to make a some tweaks again and now my CPU is running at around 90% which is perfect in my opinion because I have almost maximum performance from my PC and no issues while streaming and playing games.

Before we start tweaking

If you understand a few simple ideas then you will be able to make choices that work for you rather than just plain copying me. We all have different gaming rigs and stream different styles of games so the fixes are down to you to makes choices.

Understanding the streaming process

When you stream your capture software usually XSplit or OBS is recording your screen at the number of frames you specify, then it is resizing the dimensions of the capture as you specify and then it tries to compress it to the size rate which you specify (1800 KB/s in my case) then it sends it down the wire to Twitch.

So the more frames you have and the larger your screen resolution the larger the amount of data your CPU has to crush in order to meet your specified streaming KB/s.

On top of that CSGO is known to be a very CPU expensive game, the source engine that runs Counter-Strike uses the CPU more so than other games. Newer games pass much more of the graphic processing work to the GPU.

So in my case both CSGO and OBS are using my CPU.

You can check this by going into Task Manager, on Windows by pressing CTRL+ALT+DEL.

CPU issues when streaming and playing games on Twitch

Analyse CPU issues when streaming and playing games on Twitch!

Reducing your CPU usage is easy

You have to make some choices as to what works best for the style of games yo pay and what software and hardware you use. I outline 5 fixes below.

You may have to use all 5 of them.

Fix 1: Free up valuable CPU processing power

Press CTRL+ALT+DEL and go in to Task Manager. The first unexpected thing I noticed in Task Manager was a little program called “RzStats.Manager.exe” I saw that is was using between 10-12% of my CPU when I moved my mouse. This is because I have a Razer DeathAdder 2013 gaming mouse and when I installed the Razor Synapse 3.0 software it asked me if I would like to turn on statistic tracking for my mouse. At the time this seemed like a great idea. I soon realised that all it really does it create a heat map which is in my opinion completely useless. I disabled statistics tracking in the Razor Synapse software and then the CPU usage disappeared and I gained an extra 10% free processing power.

Analyse what is going on under the hood of your machine using Task Manager and work out what programs are hogging CPU and decide if you need them or not.

Fix 2: Reduce the amount of CPU used by the game you play

In my case CSGO is using my CPU. I like to have all my graphics settings on maximum and I still get over 150 FPS. Reducing the screen resolution of CSGO can give you more CPU if you combine that with lower graphics settings you can free up a lot of CPU power. I play 1080p and I prefer gaming in full quality so I won’t be reducing my settings in CSGO. This is my personal choice.

Adjusting the game quality settings and resolution of your game can sometimes free up CPU power, especially if your game is known for hogging CPU.

Fix 3: Stream at a lower FPS

Reduce the the number of frames per second that you record in. This is what I mentioned earlier. If you are capturing in 60 FPS you are capturing twice as much data as someone who is streaming at 30 FPS and you may have to reduce this. If you are streaming a game like Hearthstone you can probably go as low as 24 FPS without much visual concern. CSGO is a fast paced FPS and I choose to stream at 60 FPS. I can’t sacrifice this.

The lower the frame rate you stream the less CPU will be needed.

Fix 4: Downscale your stream

Downscale effectively throws away some of the data so the CPU handles less data. The less data being used the less work it does. I record my screen at 1080p and I downscale to 720p. I don’t believe many of my viewers watch my stream at full screen and even if they do 720p is still classed as HD.

The more you downscale the less CPU you will use.

Fix 5: Spend some money!!

If you have tried all of the above and still you find your games unplayable it’s time to bite the bullet and spend some money. I am serious, If you think you can be a streamer on a cheap old laptop you are probably wrong. Have a real hard look at your setup, is it really a gaming setup, more importantly can it even stream…

If all else fails go and spend some money on some new kit! 

My crappy old gaming rig

Yes I want to upgrade, I consider my setup a little old now because I have to make sacrifices to stream! I am waiting for the release of the Oculus Rift before I do any thing major with my rig. I want to be an early adapter of the VR technology that is coming and I want to stream that sh*t! Yeaaahh Buddddyy!

Motherboard: ASUS – P8P67 Deluxe
Processor: Intel Core i7-2700K CPU @ 3.50GHz
Cooling: Antec Liquid Cooling KÜHLER H2O 920
RAM: 32 GB Geil Evo 2.400 MHz DDR3 RAM
OS Hard Drives: 2 x Kingston 240GB HyperX SATA III SSD
Data Storage: 2TB Western Digital HD
Graphics: AMD Radeon HD 7800 EYEFINITY 6
Power: AMD Radeon HD 7800 EYEFINITY 6
Case: Akasa Venom Full Tower Yellow

Please look at my gaming rig spec above and if your machine is a lower spec than mine then you are probably going to have to make even more compromises than I did. if compromising is not something you want to do then you will have to simply go and spend some money on buying some better streaming kit.

The Final Word!

I left my CSGO settings on maximum plus I really want to stream at 60 FPS. My compromise comes with fix number 4, I downscale to 720p and this was enough to keep my CPU usage in check. There are some other smaller optimisations that you can make but I haven’t mentioned them because if you can’t fix your issues using fix 1, 2, 3 or 4 then I suggested you go straight to option number 5.

How many people can you invite to a Steam group per day?

The simple question with a less than simple answer. Steam groups in my opinion is one of the very best places where you can work to build new followers and viewers for your Twitch channel. The Steam community is a place where you will find your target audience, Gamers. Gamers are the people most likely to come and watch you on Twitch and Steam has literally millions of Gamers you can access.

If you do not have a Steam group then I suggest you start one. I am working on another article at the moment where I will show you how best to do that. I currently own 4 Steam groups.

I wanted to know how many people I can invite to a Steam group per day, what are the Steam group invite limits? It seems at a certain point the invites you send from the group no longer send. You can check this by reviewing your groups history. This is frustrating, but there is obvious reasons for this, for example limiting spam on the Steam network.

Google to the rescue…. or not!

I googled this question, but there is no real answers out there. I just found lots of conflicting wishy-washy opinions. The two best articles I found on the topic can be found on the Steam forums and Reddit. Neither of the posts answer the question. So I set out to discover for myself and see just how many people I can invite each day, per group.

What I did…

I have 4 Steam groups which I have been growing over the last year. I haven’t sent any invites in the past few months. I started with my main group and I invited as many people as possible, once the invites stopped being sent from that group I moved on to my second, third and fourth group. So each day for the last 10 days I have sent as many invites as Steam would allow.

The Numbers and The Steam Groups

Below are some tables detailing exactly how many invites I was able to send on each day for each group. I have included the actual group size in terms of number of current members and all of these groups are at least 6 months old so they are all quite similar in size and age. As you can see the results are a little strange, the number of invites sent goes up and down per day for no obvious reasons. I was inviting people at a rate of 3-4 people per minute and only working with one group at a time.

Steam group: FiveManDown
Members in group: 1376
Total invites sent in 10 days: 776
Average Invites sent per day: 77

Date Invites Sent
September 8th 388
September 9th 6
September 10th 0
September 11th 170
September 12th 61
September 13th 0
September 14th 0
September 15th 0
September 16th 151
September 17th 0

Steam group: Skins Club
Members in group: 3833
Total invites sent in 10 days: 702
Average Invites sent per day: 70

Date Invites Sent
September 8th 4
September 9th 439
September 10th 46
September 11th 131
September 12th 51
September 13th 0
September 14th 0
September 15th 0
September 16th 31
September 17th 0

Steam group: Twitch CSGO Giveaway Alliance
Members in group: 907
Total invites sent in 10 days: 633
Average Invites sent per day: 63

Date Invites Sent
September 8th 0
September 9th 0
September 10th 0
September 11th 101
September 12th 149
September 13th 0
September 14th 44
September 15th 220
September 16th 119
September 17th 0

Steam group: FMD CSGO Giveaways
Members in group: 545
Total invites sent in 10 days: 589
Average Invites sent per day: 59

Date Invites Sent
September 8th 0
September 9th 0
September 10th 0
September 11th 0
September 12th 1
September 13th 378
September 14th 122
September 15th 0
September 16th 66
September 17th 22

Any conclusive findings?

It seems that there is a daily limit across all groups. For example my fourth group did not gain the ability to send invites till much later in the test perhaps after my other groups had maxed out on invites. It would appear that you can send around 270 invites per day.

Total invites sent in 10 days: 2700
Average Invites sent per day: 270

Date Invites Sent
September 8th 392
September 9th 445
September 10th 46
September 11th 402
September 12th 262
September 13th 378
September 14th 166
September 15th 220
September 16th 367
September 17th 22

The Final Word

The Answer: 270 Invites Per Day! It looks like you can invite about 270 people per day across multiple groups. Somewhere between 250-450 people can be invited per day for a single group, but not all groups can be maxed out every single day. If you have multiple groups you can only max out one group per day. I still believe it is better to have more groups than less especially if you are trying to gain followers for your community or Twitch channel.

The best Twitch bot? Quite simply DeepBot

Trust me on this one. There is one sure way for a new streamer to get viewers, regulars and followers. One of the hardest things for any streamer to do is to get the active viewer count up. The easiest way to do this is with a coin bot.

Coin Bots

They come with many names, coin bot, token bot, loyalty bot, points bot, reward bot. Essentially they are all the same. A coin bot will sit in your chat room and hand out virtual coins to your viewers. Typically viewers will get rewarded with 1 coin per minute that they view your stream. This causes people to idle in your channel and collect coins, which gives you a higher viewer count and that puts you higher up the Twitch channel page. The higher you are, the more people visit the room and the more followers and viewers you gain. I typically have a minimum of 20 viewers in my channel even on a really quiet day and some of them are even AFK but I simply don’t care because I am higher up on that Twitch channel page which means fresh people are now coming into my chat room. This is how a coin bot works and this is why savvy steamers use them.

Rewarding your regular viewers

There has to be some sort of incentive attached to the collection of coins. If you run giveaways or do something for every x number of followers a coin bot can really help you get those regular viewers to stay in your chat.

No Money for giveaways?

No Problem! You can invent all kinds of ways to reward your regulars. Viewer games, sing them a song, do 10 pushups. I know not every streamer can afford to run giveaways, but giveaways don’t have to be huge amounts of money.

I personally giveaway Counter-Strike Global Offensive skins on my channel worth around 0.35€ for every 15 followers. It doesn’t break the bank. Knowing that I have around 11k followers I have easily spent over 250€ in the last year. This sounds like a huge amount amount of money but it’s really only about 20€ per month and I stream 2-3 times a week. Twitch is my Hobby, I love streaming and 20€ a month for a hobby isn’t too much to spend. I also really enjoy doing the giveaways and it gives my stream a little something extra.

Coin bot crashes – Problems with some coin bots

I have tried 3 different coin bots, I wont mention the others here but I had some issues in the past. One time I was giving away an AK47 Redline and had around 200 active viewers in my chat and my coin bot crashed. It was a nightmare as I had been preparing this giveaway for weeks and in the last minute it all failed. I looked ridiculous.

DeepBot to the rescue!

Continuing from what I said earlier I have had over 450 viewers in my chat at once all interacting with DeepBot and it has never crashed on me once. This is the only coin bot that I have found that can be trusted with large viewer numbers.

DeepBot’s other features

I would struggle to write a blog post about all of DeepBot’s other features, this bot is all singing and dancing. It is constantly being improved and updates are free of charge. Some of it’s other features include: Raffles, Auto Timers, Channel Commands, Viewer Games, Voting, Bankheist, Music, Mini Games, Gambling, User Administration, Drag Race the list goes on and on…



I don’t think a single other bot has a feature which doesn’t come included in DeepBot. If your using multiple bots it’s time to switch. DeepBot does it all. Deepbot is the best Twitch bot.

The Final Word!

DeepBot is currently in the beta stage and to get it set up and running you will have to donate $10. But this is a small price to pay for such a great Twitch bot. If your looking to get higher viewer counts then I really think you should invest in DeepBot today.

Paying for Retweets – A waste of Money?

I wanted to share a recent experience I had, I have been using Twitter to see what kind of user engagement I can create. I am looking at different ways to see if I can get new followers, retweets and favourites on Twitter and then can I get these people to follow me on my Twitch.

Creating a Tweet to get Retweets

I have done this a few times. Create a nice graphic and give people a good reason to retweet your message and you will get lots of retweets. This is a recent tweet I did, where I am giving away 2 x Bloodhound passes for Counter-Strike Global Offensive. I find this works well, giveaway tweets always work for me.

To create a good giveaway tweet I tell them what I have and I tell them what they need to do to get it. They need to retweet the message and they need to follow me on Twitch.

I have picked up approximately 30-40 new Twitch followers with this tweet within a few days of tweeting it.

Paying for Retweets

I found a service called TweetEnterprise where you can find user accounts of people that can retweet your message or even tweet a message for you for cold hard cash!

I spent a total of $11 and in theory my tweet was retweeted to around 3,468,827 Twitter users. I used these accounts below, I have included the number of followers they have and the cost of a single retweet from each account.

@DjKingAssassin – 3,311,591 – $8
@GaminRTs – 102,378 – $2
@ShoutGamers – 54,858 – $1

After I paid, I saw the retweets, it is in no way a fake service. I spent the money and the tweet was retweeted quite clearly by these accounts above. But I saw nothing to suggest that it created any more interest in my giveaway. I can only assume that these accounts are so diluted with messages that the people following them are either zombie accounts or they just did not like my tweet. I picked the accounts above because two of them seem to be gaming related and the other one was the largest account on the TweetEnterprise site.

I saw no real increase in retweets, favourites, tweets or follows… Nothing… Not a thing… I was disappointed. It is a huge shame because I would use such a service again if it had worked. I may try again a second time with a different approach or maybe using some of the smaller cheaper twitter retweet accounts.

The Final Word!

I don’t know if paying for retweets actually works, for me I just tried this service once and it didn’t have any real effect on my already quite successful tweet. For the record this tweet had around 110 retweets before I paid my $11 and at the time of writing this article it had 126 retweets and 44 favourites.

Twitch – Interacting with Viewers

Being a good streamer is not always just about being really awesome at a certain game. In my opinion I think what attracts people is your engagement with them.

Many of us probably agree and have read previously that certain things can help your stream like interacting with viewers. Also other things like having the Twitch chat visible in stream or having a follower alert where the users name pops up on screen. The reason these ideas work is because they are creating user engagement, the more you engage your viewers the more often they will come back to your stream.

Introducing Reduced Stream Delay

On the 14th of May 2015 Twitch announced that all broadcasters will now have the ability to reduce the stream delay when broadcasting on Twitch. This means that the time between you speaking and the time that your viewers hear you will be lower. This is great for user engagement. Twitch state that enabling the feature will reduce the delay by approximately 33% on average.

This basically means better user engagement, sometimes people will not hang about for an answer, they will be bored and they will simply leave your stream. In theory you can respond to your viewers in almost real-time now.

You can enable this option at any time, but it must be turned on prior to the start of your broadcast to take effect. You can turn this feature on here:

The Final Word!

I think that the reduced stream delay option is a great feature to increase user engagement, but if you’re worried about being stream sniped in games like CS:GO you should leave this feature turned off. Because Twitch have stated that the reduced delay option does come at a small quality of service cost – particularly to viewers with poor internet connections. If you’re manually adding a delay of 20-30 seconds to your broadcast to stop people stream sniping, it is not worth enabling the reduced delay feature.

Welcome to the FollowTrainTV Blog

For my first post I decided an introduction would be the best start to this blog. I am a developer and streamer. I have always helped new streamers getting setup and giving them tips and tricks to gain followers on Twitch. I have had some people do some really great things for me because of my stream and it feels good to help people when you can! I hope to inspire other streamers to also help out where they can.

It’s tough when you first start streaming but the rewards and relationships you start to form are really cool. I feel like if you can just help one person then you have one more fan on Twitch. Maybe they don’t watch  you regularly but they will always speak highly of you and help you if they can when they can.

What is FollowTrainTV?

FollowTrainTV is a side project I started to try and help new streamers get extra viewers and genuine active followers. To create a community of streamers who can play and help each other when they stream. You can ride the follow train via the main website and gain extra viewers and followers for free on Twitch.

Why did I start FollowTrain TV?

I was inspired by sites like TwitchAlerts and TwitchStarter also bots like Deepbot, Nightbot and moobot. I am a developer by day and I think it’s great that I can create useful tools and articles to help people stream and get extra followers. It’s like a secondary hobby that combines perfectly with my streaming hobby.

What can you expect to see on this blog?

I hope I can share with you – all the tips and tricks I learn as a streamer. When I first started streaming not many people were willing to help me get a head start which I was quite surprised about. It’s so easy to host people and give them some hints ans tips. I like to help other streamers and the feeling I get by helping is awesome!

Who am I?

I am FiveManDown I am a British Twitch Streamer who currently lives and streams from Switzerland, why not come and check out my channel, make sure you say ‘hi’ sometime.

Why did I start streaming?

I actually started streaming because I was amazed to see that people would watch people play video games. I have always loved video games but I guess in my early twenties I stopped playing them due to other things happening in life. Also I bought a Wii and I think it was a bad choice at the time as I didn’t really play it much. But in my heart I have always been a gamer and always loved games. As a kid I had pretty much every console that came out and this lead my career in to development as my interest in computers grew.

When did I start streaming?

I started streaming Monday October 13th 2014 and I mostly stream Counter-Strike Global Offensive on Twitch – I have a huge addiction for this game. I played since CS 1.2 over 14 years. I also love to join other peoples streams and hang out in chat, I am Twitch addicted.

Wait….. I have other questions!

If you have any questions or need help on a Twitch or streaming subject simply hit me up on Twitter @FiveManDown and I will do my best to help you out.